Sunday, October 29, 2006

Proper Crumpets

I was told in no uncertain terms today that commercial crumpets are an abomination nor are crumpets "english muffins." Such was the scandalous topic of coffee hour after church today. Being an American, the need to properly educate me on the finite culinary workings of crumpets was what I needed. Here was the recipe I was given by a roly poly English lady, with directions to disseminate the recipe "by whatever means necessary." Here goes:

Ingredients:
8 oz flour
8 oz strong white flour
2 tsp salt
1 pint milk and water, mixed
2 tblsp vegetable oil
1 tblsp sugar
1/2 oz fresh yeast
1/2 tsp baking soda
4 fl oz warm water

Sift the flours and salt into a large bowl and make a well in the center. In a pan, gently heat together the mixed milk and water, oil, and sugar until warm but not hot. Mix the yeast with a quarter of this liquid. Pour this into the well, followed by the remaining liquid and beat well until smooth and elastic; about 5 minutes. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise in a warm place for about 1 1/2 hours until frothy and about to collapse. Dissolve the baking soda in the warm water and stir into the batter. Cover and leave to rise 30 minutes.
Place metal rings or cutters on a lightly greased griddle or heavy frying pan and warm over a medium heat. Pour the batter into the rings, about 1/2 inch deep and cook gently for 5 or 6 minutes. The tops should be dry with a mass of tiny holes. Remove the rings or cutters and turn the crumpets over. Cook for 2 minutes until golden brown. Repeat with the rest of the batter. Toast on both sides, spead liberally with butter and allow to saturate the warm crumpet.

There now...your English lesson for the day.

4 comments:

Kyle said...

Photos?

The Archer of the Forest said...

Ummm...no. I ate them all. Maybe next time.

Andy Ward said...

One last go-round for the day... really, it is.

Your recipe reminded me of the bus trip I took from York to Bainbridge (my Alf Wight weekend). While riding along I took up a conversation with a matronly woman who decided I needed the recipe for the perfect scone. I wrote it in my journal at the time. If it interests you at all, I will dig it out and post it here later.

All the best, Andy Ward

The Archer of the Forest said...

Welcome to the blog, Andy. Please come and comment as often as you like.